The Founder's Blog

Be Still. Now is Our Chance

Share!

During this year of the Coronavirus, the earth has stopped spinning. We are forced to halt our hectic schedules and for a time to “Be still, and know that I am God.” He will be exalted among the nations; He will be exalted in the earth.

Psalm 46:10 is a popular verse for comforting ourselves and others. Many people tend to think this verse means to simply rest or relax in who God is. But it is more than a gentle call to rest; this verse directs us to reflect on who God is. There is more to this Psalm than one verse. The Psalm is actually a wake-up call to be in awe.

If your situation is like many of ours, your routine has been interrupted. Your busy schedule has been cleared, and you now have the margin to take a time out.

We finally have the space to be still and to meditate on Scripture with listening ears toward God. This is mentioned in other sections of Scripture (Psalm 119:15, Joshua 1:8, Luke 5:16, for example). This command to “Be Still” was written during a time of trouble and war. And we are now in a time of trouble.

Take time in this period of stillness to complete a profile on MissionNext and start a conversation as to how you can be used among the nations.

 

During this year of the Coronavirus, the earth has stopped spinning. We are forced to halt our hectic schedules and for a time to “Be still, and know that I am God.” He will be exalted among the nations; He will be exalted in the earth.

Psalm 46:10 is a popular verse for comforting ourselves and others. Many people tend to think this verse means to simply rest or relax in who God is. But it is more than a gentle call to rest; this verse directs us to reflect on who God is. There is more to this Psalm than one verse. The Psalm is actually a wake-up call to be in awe.

If your situation is like many of ours, your routine has been interrupted. Your busy schedule has been cleared, and you now have the margin to take a time out.

We finally have the space to be still and to meditate on Scripture with listening ears toward God. This is mentioned in other sections of Scripture (Psalm 119:15, Joshua 1:8, Luke 5:16, for example). This command to “Be Still” was written during a time of trouble and war. And we are now in a time of trouble.

Take time in this period of stillness to complete a profile on MissionNext and start a conversation as to how you can be used among the nations.

 

Nelson Malwitz, Founder, Chief Innovation Officer

Nelson Malwitz, Founder, Chief Innovation Officer

Nelson is the generic Evangelical baby-boomer. Born in 1946, raised in the C&MA, he attended Urbana ’67 in college. He holds an MS degree in Chemical Engineering and worked in R&D positions in American industry for 33 years. Nelson is an inventor with formal training in methods of creative problem-solving. He was a founding elder at Walnut Hill Community Church in Bethel, CT (1982) and served in many leadership capacities of what is now one of the largest Evangelical churches in New England. In 1998 Nelson founded the Finishers Project, now MissionNext. Locally he attends a Torah study and serves as chairman of the Sewer Commission in his community to be a witness among unchurched leaders.

Author Posts

Share this Post!

2 thoughts on “Be Still. Now is Our Chance”

  1. A great reminder for this world today. Besides being still and listening, something else we can do in these difficult times is to actually do what the Hebrew words in the Scripture references say to do. The Hebrew words for “meditate” actually mean to “murmur,” to “mutter,” to “utter.” In Psalm 119:15, the word “meditate” means “to converse (with oneself and hence aloud.)” Talking to ourselves is a great help in many situations. So during this time of heightened fear and dread in our world, speaking Scriptures out loud to ourselves will bring comfort and encouragement to our souls.

    Reply

Leave a Comment

Follow MissionNext!

TOP POSTS

recent posts

recent comments

Yes, I'm In!

Don’t miss another blog post!